Welcome To Prospect Estate

Travel Where it Matters Most To You

Discover 1,000 acre Prospect Estate on the north coast of Jamaica, nestled between the azure waters of the Caribbean Sea and the lush greenery of the mountains.

Choose from one of our 5 stunning villas

Each offering the services of a personal villa concierge, exceptional accommodation, premium service, private beach and or swimming pools with lush tropical gardens. All of the villas are located on the Estate’s water front with spectacular ocean views.

Prospect Estate is a short distance from the picturesque town of Ocho Rios, one mile east of the White River which separates the parishes of St. Ann and St. Mary. The Prospect Estate Villas are approximately a one and a half hour drive from the airport in Montego Bay and two hours from the airport in Kingston.

Enjoy our

Amenities

Eat, relax and play on the property and choose from a suite of Villa activities: try our jogging trails with views of the mountain range or enjoy laps in the swimming pool. Guest health and well-being are essential to us so we ensure that while on their stay at any of our villas we open the door to a range of activities that will allow a healthy lifestyle on their visit. However, for those seeking to rejuvenate their mind, body and soul, local spa treatments can be provided.

Additionally, all our guests enjoys full-access to our shared on-site gym and tennis court.

Indulge in soothing

Nature

The best way to see and experience Jamaica is to get outside. Between the waterfront and local excursions, there is something for everyone. Take a dune-buggy ride in the mountains, paddle board in our open waters, or hitch a ride on a Camel. Whatever fits your interest, we are here to help you experience it like a local.

All guests of Prospect Villas enjoys a 50% discount on all Yaaman Adventure tours.

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A Short History

Prospect Estate was purchased by Sir Harold Mitchell, in 1936, without him ever having laid eyes on it.

His affection for Jamaica began when he was a small boy, inspired by his well-travelled uncle Paton who told tales of earthquakes, multi-coloured humming birds and the buccaneers of Port Royal. Paton presented Sir Harold with exotic gifts of parrots and, even rarer in Edwardian Scotland, grapefruit.

Later, another of Sir Harold’s uncles, Arthur, who owned a plantation in Jamaica, notified his nephew of a 1,000 acre estate which was being offered for sale. The property had a mile long sea frontage and rose to a height of nearly 1,000 feet. The Great House, situated on a prominent hill overlooking the Caribbean Sea, was built in the 18th century as a single storey, rectangular fort. A second storey was added in the 19th century to make it habitable.

In 1947, Sir Harold married and arrived at the Great House with his bride, Mary Mitchell (née Pringle).

Over the next 40 years Sir Harold and Lady Mitchell hosted heads of state, royalty and diplomats and established a custom of inviting their guests to plant trees on the Estate.

Amongst the dignitaries were Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill, British Prime Minister Sir Edward Heath, U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, H.R.H. Prince Phillip and U.S. Ambassador to the U.N., Andrew Young. There remains today a large Jamaican mahogany, near the entrance to the Great House, which was planted by Sir Winston Churchill in 1953.

Sir Harold established large areas of the estate with crops such as Jamaican pimento (all spice), coconuts, limes, bananas, pineapples, coffee and sugar cane, which thrived alongside native hardwood trees, primarily mahogany and cedar. While the property ceased its commercial agricultural practices in the 1980's examples of these crops have been maintained and form part of the daily Prospect Outback Adventures tour which is open to guests and visitors alike.

Prospect College

Prospect College was founded in 1956 by Sir Harold Mitchell. The College is a private high school and is located on Prospect Estate and provides full scholarships to 35 boys, grades 9, 10 and 11. Discipline is of paramount importance at the school and the cadets excel at academics

Prospect Estate

Weddings

If your desire is a ceremony in paradise, this is the perfect destination for your event.

Prospect Chapel

Prospect Estate’s non-denominational chapel was built in 1970 by Sir Harold Mitchell. The Chapel is constructed entirely of stone and hardwood harvested from the estate. It’s modern charm yet enchanting appeal is home to many beautiful and memorable ceremonies. The Prospect Chapel has capacity for one hundred and twenty guests seated inside and an additional 80 guests in the wings.

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The Great House

The historic Great House sits atop a prominent hill at the heart of Prospect Estate and has an uninterrupted view of the Caribbean Sea. It is possibly the best preserved of all the Jamaican Great Houses kept as residences today. The Great House was originally built as a fort and later developed into a home. Its walls are three feet thick, constructed of blocks of locally sourced white limestone and have twenty nine gun-loops.

It is furnished with fine antique mahogany furniture which blends perfectly with the weathered cedar paneling. 18th century seascapes, Spanish floral pieces and ancestral portraits decorate the interior.

An extensive garden was originally laid out with shrubs of bougainvillea, allamanda and beaumontia, all of which continue to be immaculately maintained today.

The Great House retains its original charm and 19th century grandeur. Visitors are intrigued by the history of the house, the beauty of the gardens and marvel at the spectacular views. A visit to the Great House is included in the Yaaman Adventure tour.

The lawns and gardens of the Great House are ideal for weddings and special events and can accommodate up to two hundred guests.

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See what guests say about Prospect Estate and Villas

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